A summertime favorite – Pickled Beets but simpler!

Nothing takes me back to being a kid more than eating homemade pickled items – pickled beets, pickles, and pickled relish. When I was a kid my mom did a lot of pickling and so did my paternal grandma. Can’t forget to mention aunts as well… we were a well oiled pickling machine. They would can in the fall and then by summer it would all be ready. By spring time I would have those wonderful tastes in my mouth, watering for those wonderful items… and then finally summer would show and it was time to eat the delicious treasure that was brewing inside those cans all winter long.

It’s funny how things like that can take you back.

For the longest time I’ve been yearning to can. I love, love, love pickled beets and for a while I was making the quick version – refrigerated beets. They’re so easy! Anybody can do it! I don’t know why I stopped, but now I’m back at it and so excited. Fresh made pickled beets… I could sit there and eat an entire jar and not even care that I didn’t share with anybody else.

Refrigerated pickled beets are not that hard to make and the bonus is you don’t have to wait an entire season to devour them! Here’s the recipe that I use that I want to share with you!

What you need

  • Four large beets
  • Tupperware jars with screw on lids (or cans… doesn’t matter, I use Tupperware)
  • Large pot to boil beets
  • 2 cups of vinegar
  • 1 medium yellow onion
  • 2 tbsp dill weed
  • 1/3 cup white sugar

What to do

  1. Fill a large pot of water with the beets in them. You want to cover the beets completely. Bring to a boil, reduce heat to medium and continue to boil until beets are tender, but not hard. It took me an hour to accomplishment. Make sure you check the pot from time to time, so the water doesn’t evaporate and you burn it and the beets. I did this once… it was a disaster. I lost a pot.
  2. Remove beets, but do not drain water from the pot. You need this beet water for your “canning” process. Place beets in a large bowl and add cold water. Drain and repeat three times. Finally on the fourth time, leave beets to soak in the cold water. Leave for half an hour.
  3. Slice up onion and set aside.
  4. With the water what you boiled the beets in, add the 2 cups vinegar, 1/3 cup white sugar, sliced onion and dill weed. Stir and cover. Let sit as your beets are cooling.
  5. After beets are completely cool, begin removing skin and cut off tops and bottoms. The skin will be so soft that you can peel off with your hands. When beets are peeled, cut beets in to cubes (see photo below).
  6. Place beets in to your containers. Using a ladle fill containers with beet water, but do not let over flow. It will be a mess in your fridge. Your container should also contain the onions. Tighten lids and put in fridge.

Refrigerator beets work best when you leave them there for one day or more. This allows the vinegar to pickle. Refrigerated beets are basically the same as canning, minus submerging the cans in water to seal the jars and the duration of said pickling.

These are simply delicious. Each bite takes me back to being a kid when I would watch my mom and grandma in their canning process. It reminds me of opening the car come summer, hearing the seal pop and finally being able to devour what has been sitting in the can week after week pickling themselves. It’s going to be a great adventure heading to farmer’s markets to pick out the best beets to pickle, getting home and then starting the process. It makes me so excited just thinking about it! Pickled beets… get in mah belly!

Do you like pickled items? What are you favorites?

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2 Comments Add yours

  1. elle marie says:

    I have not had pickled beets since I was a child, thanks for bringing it back, I remember how much I love them.

    1. You’re welcome! You might want to add more vinegar once you have the beets canned. I found that it wasn’t too vinegary when I canned them. But it all depends on how much vinegar you like.

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